Spotlight On…Food Acceptance | Identity

Category Archives: Spotlight On…Food Acceptance

The Spotlight On…By Joann DiFabio-Klinkner hones in on a particular type of food product. Joann educates us these foods to help us make the choice to eat it because of its goodness or not eat it due to it’s damaging affects. Read and learn about these foods so you can continue to feed your body the proper energy to achieve a balanced lifestyle diet.

pumpkin seeds

Spotlight On…Pumpkin Seeds

Pumpkin seeds are flat, dark green seeds that live inside the hollow cavity of pumpkins, a member of the gourd family. The seeds of the jack-o-lantern-type pumpkins are typically found encased in a pale yellow husk, but once cracked open, reveal the green seed inside. However, some varieties of pumpkins do not have this same husk around their seeds.

lentils

Spotlight On…Lentils, Garbanzos, and Peas, Oh My!

There is a category of crops out there that not many people have heard of. They’re called pulses. Let me guess…never heard of them, right? I didn’t think so! Well, pulses are not only good for your health, but they also have significant agricultural benefits. And in case you haven’t guessed by now, lentils, garbanzos, and peas all fall under the pulse category.

Fiber

Spotlight On…Fiber

Surely you’ve been told in your life to eat more fiber in order to stay more “regular”. It’s a pretty well known fact that fiber and intestinal regularity go hand in hand. But do you know why fiber is so good for you?

figs

Spotlight On…Figs

Fresh figs have a unique texture that combines the tenderness of their flesh, the smoothness of their skin, and the crunchiness of their seeds. They are deliciously sweet but never tart. Some people may have “texture issues” with fresh figs, but if you can get past that, they are one of the most uniquely delicious fruits on earth.

brusselsprouts

Spotlight On…Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are available year-round, but are at their peak from autumn to early spring. They get their name from Brussels, the capital of Belgium, where they are thought to have originated from. Nowadays, they are cultivated throughout Europe and the United States, most of the US crop coming from California.