From the Editor

How to Become More Adaptable to Change

Identity Magazine
Susan Vernicek
Written by Susan Vernicek

It’s a New YOU Year and there is one skill or characteristic that I aim to exemplify year after year. It might not be easy for many individuals to demonstrate, however, living by it steadfastly, I can say that it is one of the characteristics that I love about myself.

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It’s a New YOU Year and there is one skill or characteristic that I aim to exemplify year after year. It might not be easy for many individuals to demonstrate, however, living by it steadfastly, I can say that it is one of the characteristics that I love about myself.


It is ADAPTABILITY and I believe that many women strive to add at least a little of this ability to their daily lives.

I’m celebrating the 10-year anniversary of Identity Magazine this very month–January–and throughout the year! I’m still in shock that it has been 10 years since I embarked upon the amazing journey as a business owner building Identity Magazine, my Fempire. (Yes, it’s in the Urban Dictionary!)

It was essentially during my 5th year as an Entrepreneur that my life truly shifted. I had exited my full time, 9 to 5 career, rented an office, and picked up a bartending job on the weekends. I ran the magazine Monday through Friday and hired my first interns: It all felt so surreal.

After the first year that Identity became ‘official,’ my boyfriend– now my husband Rob— proposed to me. I honestly had no clue that that was going to occur, and within a year of that momentous event I was living an hour away from my office, and bartending job—and this is where adaptability comes into play.

Roll with it. Change. Adapt. Experiment.

With this change in residence, everyone on my staff would then work remotely because it made the most sense to save money and time by working from home. I recognize that having an office for a year was huge and a pivotal time for the magazine. I could have easily complained, or have been really sad or frustrated because it was short lived, but I knew then and even as I look back now that it happened in that order for a reason.

Since I can remember, I have been a pretty easygoing woman and I value that characteristic as well. I love that I stand up for what I believe or want when necessary, yet I’m game to vacation, eat out, or drive just about anywhere to visit my friends. I’m neither picky nor demanding in those regards.

Gleaned from my own experience and conversations with other women, following are 5 areas you can work on to help yourself become more adaptable to change.

1. Work on being open-minded. Being open-minded can apply to various aspects of our lives. My message here is to inspire you to try to listen to others more, try new activities, and if something isn’t working out the way you want it to, to be open to the natural course of events and experiences. Trust with an open mind that the journey is in full swing, pay attention and embrace it as best as you can.

2. Work to become more flexible. Think about every part of your day, be it personally or within your career. Now, I know that deadlines are important and there are situations wherein flexibility is not an option. Even so, there are many other arenas where working on your flexibility can improve much in life (and when I say flexible I mean “giving or taking” a few yards of rope.) For instance, I used to always be ready to go out before my friends. I would become extremely frustrated waiting for them, but later, I thought: What’s the hurry? Why rush somebody? Think about the times you get to take your time and enjoy getting ready, or take your time driving, or take your time working on project, or take your time cleaning and dancing to music—It’s much more enjoyable and usually the end result is better.

3. Work to determine what’s important. Often I catch myself getting frustrated or irritated, mainly because I prefer to be in control. Over the years I have gained control over my control. LOL. I talk to myself internally about what’s really important in a given situation: one when I might, for instance, get angry, say hurtful things, scream …SO, I choose the “what’s most important” angle. Pretty much every time I shrug my shoulders because in the end nobody is dying or getting hurt.

4. Work to become aware of worse case/best case scenarios. I often implement this approach in my life—play out the potentials of a situation. It truly helps me to keep calm and open-minded. Give it a shot.

5. Ask for Help. One of the key elements to becoming a little more adaptable is asking for help. Especially if a circumstance or even a thought or feeling isn’t sitting right with you, ask for support or talk it through.

Every year we strive for forward shifts and growth within our personal and professional lives. Maybe this is the year that you can work on becoming a little more adaptable to change as you journey upward and onward.

Identity Magazine is all about empowering women to get all A’s in the game of life – Accept. Appreciate. Achieve.™ Every contributor and expert answer the Identity 5 questions in keeping with our theme. Their answers can be random and in the moment or they can be aligned with the above article. As a team, we hope to inspire and motivate ourselves and inspire you to get all A’s.

1. What have you accepted within your life, physically and/or mentally? What are you still working on accepting?

I’ve accepted that some people that I encounter won’t be as easy going and that is just one of the many layers that create their identity.

2. What have you learn to appreciate about yourself and/or within your life, physically and mentally? What are you still working on to appreciate?

I appreciate being open-minded and easy going.  I like NOT causing stress to situations.

3. What is one of your most rewarding achievements in life? What makes YOU most proud? What goals and dreams do you still have?

At this very moment and taking about this topic, it makes me think back to living in London and living in a hostel for a few weeks and working freelance from a bunk bed. Proud of never making excuses to find ways to make money.

4. We all have imperfections, so we think. The truth—we are all perfectly imperfect. What are your not-so-perfect ways? What imperfections and quirks create who you are—your Identity?

Sometimes I’m too easygoing when it comes to making decisions on dinner or where to eat it can be annoying.  Sometimes my husband or friends want me to decide.  

5. “I Love My…” is an outlet for you to express and appreciate all the positive traits that make you…well… YOU! Sharing what you love about yourself will make you smile, feel empowered, and uplift your spirit and soul. (we assure you!) Identity challenges you to complete the phrase “I Love My…?”

I love my ability to be adaptable 🙂

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About the author

Susan Vernicek

Susan Vernicek

Facts about Susan Vernicek:
• She’s happily married and a mother of twins.

• She’s tried almost every fad diet back in her quick-fix days, admits at age 34 it’s a struggle to work hard on overall balance and is focused on not giving into the unhealthy fads we see daily.

• She’s all natural with natural blonde hair, uneven breasts, a bigger nose, and full of curves that she learns to appreciate more and more each day.

• She had a career where part of her job was staring at herself 40 hours a week manipulating her very own face as well as others.

• She’s the youngest of 7, ranging from 30-50+, an Aunt, Great Aunt and even younger than some of her nieces and nephews!

• She’s traveled and seen over 8 countries and spent a summer in London finding her passion and embracing life.

• She created S&J Identity, Inc. AKA Identity Magazine, having no business background and at the age of 25.