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How to Spend Quality Time with Your Kids

Quality time with Kids
Written by Lilia Ortiz

According to a 2013 Pew Research study, 56 percent of working mothers feel stressed about balancing work and family life. Spending time with your children is important but it can be a difficult when it feels like your career is taking over your life. Try these tips on how to fit in more quality time with your kids.

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According to a 2013 Pew Research study, 56 percent of working mothers feel stressed about balancing work and family life. Spending time with your children is important but it can be a difficult when it feels like your career is taking over your life. Try these tips on how to fit in more quality time with your kids.


Maximizing the time you can spend with your kids is the ideal way to make every minute count. Remember, when it comes to family time quality over quantity is always best.

Prepare Meals in Advance

You can spend more time with your children by cutting down on the amount of time spent on chores. For instance, choose a day to prepare meals for the entire week and freeze them. You’ll spend less time in the kitchen and more time at your dining table. If you don’t know where to begin, Once a Month Meals is a great resource for meal planning and food prep strategies. Additionally, you can include your kids in the cooking process (and, in turn, spend more time with them) by letting them help you with simple tasks, such as putting food items in plastic bags and wiping down counters.

Schedule Daily Playtime

A structured schedule is a must for every busy family. Don’t forget to set aside 30 minutes of fun, ideally after dinner, before bedtime. You can play board games, read a book or even go out for a walk if the weather is nice. Regardless of which activity you choose, make sure to turn off your cellphone and give your children the undivided attention they crave. You’ll not only strengthen the bond you have with them, but you’ll also lower your own stress by doing something that’s entertaining and non-work related.

Make Errands Fun

Take full advantage of the time by running errands with your kids. The result? Combining your daily schedule with together time keeps you productive without sacrificing family time. You can turn grocery shopping into a scavenger hunt by having your kids find the items on your list or make an outing even more fun with a treat of ice cream or lunch, suggests Reader’s Digest.

Avoid Over-Scheduling

Sometimes it’s not you who’s too busy, it’s your kids. Limit them to one after-school activity that doesn’t conflict with dinnertime. With a little creativity you can bring the extracurricular to your own home. If your child is part of the swim team, give him or her a place to practice at home. Your budding athlete won’t have to stay late to use the school’s pool. Having a pool also means the rest of you can join in for an impromptu family pool night. Alternatively, maybe biking is more your family’s style. Venture out in the evenings, biking around the neighborhood to stay active. Having the right resources to help your child succeed is the best way to keep them close to home.

Teach While You Repair

Home improvements don’t have to be a one-woman job. In fact, getting your kids involved when you repair a leaky faucet, repaint a room or replace a lightbulb is a great way to teach them life skills they’ll need in the future, says Parents.com. Younger children can hold the flashlight while you work, while older ones can help you during the repair process. You’ll turn your home in a classroom and get a necessary chore out of the way, a win-win for all. After the job is done ask them what they learned to reinforce the newly acquired knowledge.

Identity Magazine is all about empowering women to get all A’s in the game of life – Accept. Appreciate. Achieve.™ Every contributor and expert answer the Identity 5 questions in keeping with our theme. As a team, we hope to inspire and motivate ourselves and inspire you to get all A’s.

What have you accepted within your life, physically and/or mentally? What are you still working on accepting?

Accepting that I can’t control every aspect of my life took time.

What have you learn to appreciate about yourself and/or within your life, physically and mentally? What are you still working on to appreciate?

I appreciate the opportunities that have been granted to me throughout my life because they’ve helped create a better version of me.

What is one of your most rewarding achievements in life? What makes YOU most proud? What goals and dreams do you still have?

One of the most rewarding achievements in my life has been graduating from college and beginning a career I love. I continue to work toward advancing my professional life by learning new skills.

We all have imperfections, so we think. The truth—we are all perfectly imperfect. What are your not-so-perfect ways? What imperfections and quirks create who you are—your Identity?

I am not always as patient as I should be when it comes to seeing results. However, that imperfections helps me realize when I need to change my goals or direction in life.

“I Love My…” is an outlet for you to express and appreciate all the positive traits that make you…well… YOU! Sharing what you love about yourself will make you smile, feel empowered, and uplift your spirit and soul. (we assure you!)

Identity challenges you to complete the phrase “I Love My…?

I love my family and friends!

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About the author

Lilia Ortiz

Lilia Ortiz is a freelance writer, graphic design student and bookworm with three years of writing and editing experience, particularly on lifestyle, design and tech topics. She edited Pax the Polar Bear, a children's book on global warming.

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